Radiology | Naas General Hospital (2024)

X-ray, Plain Radiography

X-ray is the original and most widely used form of diagnostic imaging. The area of the body being examined is positioned underneath the X-ray tube and small amounts of radiation are passed through it. An image is then produced either on a film or on a computer screen. This technique is frequently used to examine the chest/abdomen and bones of the body.
Studies of the gastrointestinal system (stomach and bowel) and urinary system (kidneys, ureters and bladder) are performed using X-rays after a contrast agent or ‘dye’ has been administered to the patient.
X-rays may result in either still or moving images, depending on the structure being examined.
Any examination involving radiation must be requested in writing by a qualified prescriber (i.e. medical doctor or dentist) and must be carried out under the clinical responsibility of a person qualified in radiation safety.

Procedure
You will be asked to lie on a table or stand up to a board and will be positioned for the requested examination by a radiographer. If still images are required, typically two or more X-rays are taken from different angles, so that the radiologist may fully evaluate the region being studied.

Preparation
There is no special preparation required for plain X-ray examinations. You may be asked to change into a hospital gown and jewellery and any other metallic objects must be removed so as not to interfere with the area being examined.

Please see the appropriate patient information for any special X-ray procedures e.g. Barium studies or IVPs.

IVP – Intravenous Pyelogram

Your doctor has requested that you have an IVP, which is a special examination of the kidneys, urethers and bladder.

ATTENTION FEMALE PATIENTS
This examination cannot be performed if you are pregnant or there is any possibility of pregnancy. If you are aged between approximately 11 and 55 years, your appointment must be within 10 days of the start of your last menstrual period.

Do I need to follow a special diet?
YES. You must not eat anything from the midnight before the examination. However, you should continue to drink water.

Are there any precautions?
YES. If you have asthma or any allergies, please ring the department

(Tel: 045-849810) for further instructions. You must also inform the medicalstaff on the day of the examination.

If you are diabetic and are taking the medication Metaformin or Glucophage,please ring the department (Tel: 045-849810) for further instructions.

What happens on the day of the examination?
You will enter the hospital through the new main entrance on Craddockstown Road. The Radiology Department is signposted from there and is a shortdistance away. On arrival at radiology reception, you may go to any of the reception hatches where you will be registered for the examination. You will then go to the waiting area and a member of staff will show you to a changing cubicle. You will be asked to put on a hospital gown for the examination. When you are ready, you will be shown to the X-ray room where the procedure will take place.

What does the procedure involve?
You will lie on your back on the X-ray table and one image will be taken by the radiographer (X-ray technologist). This will be checked by a radiologist (doctor who specialises in X-rays). You will then have an injection of a contrast medium (dye) in a vein in your hand/arm. You may experience a hot flushed feeling or a metallic taste in the mouth after the injection but this quickly passes. The radiographer will take a number of other X-rays at different intervals. You may be asked to empty your bladder before the last X-ray is taken. When all the images have been checked, you may go home.

What happens after the examination?
You will be able to go back to work afterwards and you can eat and drink normally as soon as the test is finished. If you feel unwell within seven days after this examination, please contact this department or your GP for further advice.

The results of the test will be sent to the doctor who asked for you to have an IVP. This will take up to 5 working days. You should make an appointment to see this doctor again and have the results explained to you.

Barium Meal/Swallow

Your doctor has requested that you have a Barium Swallow/Barium Meal, which is a special examination of the oesophagus (gullet) and stomach. Frequently a barium swallow and meal are performed together. For these examinations, you will be required to drink a liquid dye called barium.

ATTENTION FEMALE PATIENTS
This examination cannot be performed if you are pregnant or there is anypossibility of pregnancy. If you are aged between approximately 11 and 55 years, your appointment must be within 10 days of the start of your last menstrual period.

Do I need to follow a special diet?
YES. In order for this examination to be successful, your stomach must be very empty. You must not eat, drink or smoke anything after 10pm the night before the examination. However, if you are diabetic, you must contact the Radiology Department (Tel: 045-849810) before you commence fasting.

What happens on the day of the examination?
You will enter the hospital through the new main entrance on CraddockstownRoad. The Radiology Department is signposted from there and is a short distance away. On arrival at radiology reception, you may go to any of the reception hatches where you will be registered for the examination. You will then go to the Barium waiting area and a member of staff will show you to a changing cubicle. You will be asked to put on a hospital gown for the examination. When you are ready, you will go to the X-ray room and the procedure will start.

What does the procedure involve?
In the X-ray room, you will be asked to swallow some fizzy granules, which will produce a gas in the stomach. Then you will be asked to drink some of the barium mixture (thick white fluid). This will outline the gullet and stomach. You may have a small injection in the arm, which will reduce the movement of the stomach for the procedure.

A radiologist (doctor who specialises in X-rays) will watch the passage of the barium on a TV screen and will take a series of X-ray films. When the images have been checked, you may go home.The examination is usually completed within 30 minutes.We advise you to drink plenty of fluid for the next two days to wash the barium out of your system and prevent constipation.

What happens after the examination?
You will be able to go back to work afterwards. If you have had the injection, we advise you not to drive for one hour afterwards.

The results of the test will be sent to the doctor who asked for you to have a barium meal/ swallow. This will take up to 5 working days. You should make an appointment to see the doctor again and have the results explained to you.

Barium Enema

Your doctor has requested that you have a Barium Enema, which is a special X-ray examination of the large bowel or gut.

ATTENTION FEMALE PATIENTS
This examination cannot be performed if you are pregnant or there is any possibility of pregnancy. If you are aged between approximately 11 and 55 years, your appointment must be within 10 days of the start of your last menstrual period.

Do I need to follow a special diet?
YES. In order for this examination to be successful, your bowel (gut) must be very empty. It is therefore very important that you follow the special diet and laxative preparation instructions very carefully. If you are diabetic, please contact the Radiology Department (Tel: 045-849810) for further instructions.

PLEASE READ THE INSTRUCTIONS HERE AND FOLLOW THEM CAREFULLY
Two days before the examination
A normal breakfast is allowed.
A mainly liquid diet (e.g. clear soups, jelly, soft drinks, tea and coffee) is allowed. Small portions of cheese, fish and eggs may also be included. No alcohol is allowed.

One day before examination
Before breakfast (not later than 8am), take the first sachet of Picolax (You will receive this by post) mixed in a cup of water. Drink at least two pints of water afterwards.
Expect a thoroughly cleansing bowel action 5–8 hours after the Picolax is taken

Breakfast: (8am–9 am)
If taken, boiled/poached egg and/or white bread with a scrape of butter or margarine. No jam or marmalade.

Lunch: (1 pm–2 pm)
A small portion of steamed, poached or grilled white fish or chicken with a small portion of boiled potato or white bread.
Clear jelly may be taken for dessert.
2 hours after lunch (not later than 4pm), take the second sachet of Picolax mixed in a cup of water.

Supper
No solid food allowed. Clear soup/meat extracts drink followed by jelly for dessert. No further food is allowed until after the examination.

Note: Expect frequent and loose bowel movements. Drink plenty of fluids to satisfy thirst (i.e. at least six pints of fluid each day before examination).

On the day of the examination
You may have a single cup of tea or coffee for breakfast.

What happens on the day of the examination?
You will enter the hospital through the new main entrance on Craddockstown Road. The Radiology Department is signposted from there and is a short distance away. On arrival at radiology reception, you may go to any of the reception hatches where you will be registered for the examination. You then go to the Barium waiting area and a member of staff will show you to a changing cubicle. You will be asked to put on a hospital gown for the examination. When you are ready, you will go to the X-ray room and the procedure will proceed.

What does the procedure involve?
In the X-ray room, you will have to lie on the X-ray table. A rubber tube is inserted into your rectum (back passage) by the radiologist (doctor who specialises in X-ray procedures). Once the tube is in place, some white barium fluid is run into your bowel through the tube. This will not be painful. You will be asked to turn over on the table a few times so that the barium coats the whole of the bowel. The radiologist will also insert some air into the bowel through the tube. A series of X-rays will then be taken. When the images have been checked, you will go to the toilet to pass most of the barium before you go home. The examination is usually completed within 60 minutes.

What happens after the examination?
You will be able to go back to work afterwards. The results of the test will be sent to the doctor who asked for you to have the barium enema. This will take up to 5 working days. You should make an appointment to see the doctor again and have the results explained to you.

Ultrasound Examinations

Your doctor has requested that you have an Ultrasound Scan. This is a type of scan, that does not involve X-rays, and it is used to visualise many body organs (e.g. liver, kidneys, gall bladder, ovaries, vascular system, testicl*s and joint spaces).

Do I need to follow a special diet?
YES. There are different preparation instructions for different ultrasound examinations. Please follow the instructions appropriate to your examination.

For Abdomen
Morning Appointment: You must have nothing to eat, drink or smoke
Afternoon Appointment:You may have a light breakfast and must not eat, drink or smoke after that.

For Pelvis
You will not have to fast. You will have to drink 3 pints of water 2 hours before your appointment time. Do not empty your bladder after you start to drink the water. You may be asked to drink more water if your bladder is not sufficiently full for the scan.

For Abdomen and Pelvis
Morning Appointment: You must have nothing to eat, drink, or smoke from midnight the night before. Also, please try not to empty your bladder on the morning of your scan. Afternoon Appointment:You may have a light breakfast at 9am and must not eat drink or smoke after that. Please try not to empty your bladder after breakfast. You will be asked to drink water and wait for your bladder to fill if it appears empty at the time of scanning.

For Other Ultrasound, no preparation is required.
What happens on the day of the examination?
You will enter the hospital through the new main entrance on Craddockstown Road. The Radiology Department is signposted from there and is a short distance away. On arrival at radiology reception, you may go to any of the reception hatches where you will be registered for the examination. You will then go the ultrasound changing area. You will be asked to change into a hospital gown and shown to the examination room.

What does the procedure involve?
You will lie on the couch in the examination room. The examination will be carried out by a radiologist (doctor who specialises in imaging) or radiographer (imaging technologist). A jelly-like substance will be spread over the area to be examined. A special probe will then be moved over the area. The examination is entirely painless and is usually completed within 15 minutes.

What happens after the examination?
You will be able to go back to work afterwards. The results of the scan will be sent to the doctor who asked for you to have an ultrasound. This will take up to 5 working days. You should make an appointment to see this doctor again and have the results explained to you.

C.T.Scan

What is a C.T. Scan?
C.T. stands for computed tomography – a technical term for a special type of X-ray examination. An X-ray beam passes through the body, which is absorbed in varying amounts. This information is fed into a computer, which produces cross-sectional images on a TV monitor. The length of time you will be in the department varies depending on the type of scan you are having

What happens during your scan?
You will be asked to lie on the C.T. table and the radiographer will assist you into the correct position. The table is raised up and will move back through the scanner. You will not feel any pain or abnormal sensations during the scan but it is important that you remain very still. The radiographer will speak to you during the scan and you may be instructed to hold your breath (this does not apply to all examinations). The radiographer will be able to see and hear you all during the scan. Once all the images have been acquired and checked, you may leave the scan room. You will be asked to remain in the C.T. waiting area for about 20 minutes after your scan.

Do I have to fast for the examination?
It depends on the type of C.T. scan you are having. You will be informed about any necessary preparation when you receive your appointment details.

Do I have an injection?
An injection of a contrast agent or X-ray ‘dye’ is required for most C.T. examinations. This injection will be given through a needle placed in your arm or in the back of your hand. You may experience a hot flushed feeling or a metallic taste in the mouth after the injection, but this quickly passes.

Are there any precautions?
YES. If you have asthma or any allergies (e.g. seafood allergy), please ring the department (Tel: 045-849921) for further instructions.

If you have ever had an allergic reaction to X-ray dye in the past, please ring the department (Tel: 045-849921) for further instructions. You must also inform the radiography staff on the day of the examination.

If you are diabetic and taking the medication Metformin or Glucophage, please ring the department (Tel: 045-849921) for further instructions.

ATTENTION FEMALE PATIENTS
If you are aged between approximately 10 and 57 years of age, certain types of C.T. examinations maybe carried out only within the first 10 days of your menstrual cycle. The C.T. clerical staff will contact you if this applies to your scan, and an appropriate appointment will be made for you.

What happens after the examination?
You will be able to go back to work afterwards and you can eat and drink normally as soon as the scan is finished. If you feel unwell within seven days after this examination, please contact this department or your GP for advice.

Please be aware that occasionally emergencies will occur – a critically ill patient from casualty or the intensive care unit may require an immediate scan that is vital to their care, and this may cause delays to the appointment system. We appreciate your co-operation in this matter.

MRI Examinations

Your doctor has requested that you have an MRI scan. This study produces very detailed images of the body part being examined. The scanner is a mobile unit which goes between hospitals and is located at Naas Hospital every Thursday. MRI does not use ‘radiation’, rather it combines the use of a very large magnet and radiowaves to create the images.

BEFORE THE SCAN
The MRI scanner consists of a large, very powerful magnet. Because of this, there are some precautions we have to take at the time of making your scan appointment. You will be asked the following questions:

  1. Do you have a cardiac pacemaker?
  2. Do you have any aneurysm clips in your head?
  3. Do you have any kind of implanted devices in your body?
  4. Have you ever worked with metal or got metal fragments in your eyes or anywhere else in your body?


If you answer YES to either question 1 or 2 you may NOT have an MRI scan.
If you answer YES to either question 3 or 4 we will evaluate the situation before making your appointment.

IS THERE ANY SPECIAL PREPARATION?
There is NO preparation for the vast majority of MRI examinations. Continue to eat and drink as normal and take your medication as prescribed. If we do require you to fast for your examination you will be given clear instructions when your appointment is being made.

WHAT HAPPENS ON THE DAY OF THE EXAMINATION?
You will enter the hospital through the new main entrance on Craddockstown Road. The Radiology Department is signposted from there and is a short distance away. On arrival at radiology reception you will be registered for the examination.You will be asked to complete and sign a detailed ‘safety questionnaire’ form if you have not done so already.

You will then be brought to the MRI unit where you will be asked to change into a hospital gown. All metallic items e.g. watches, coins, keys, hair clips, lighters, jewellery and items such as credit/ ATM cards must be removed before you enter the scan room.

WHAT DOES THE PROCEDURE INVOLVE?
The MRI scanner consists of the large tubular magnet and the scanning table. The MR Radiographer (operator of the scanner) will position you on the table and move you into the machine. This remains open at both ends all the time and is illuminated. There is constant contact between you and the Radiographer during the examination.

Noise – during your scan you will hear a series of loud tapping and knocking sounds. This can last from a few seconds to several minutes at a time. You will be given ear-plugs or headphones playing music to wear to help block out this noise.

Duration of Scan – The average length of time for a scan is about 20-30 minutes. Some studies may be shorter and other more complex procedures may take upto 1 hour. It is very important that you remain very still during the examination. If you move while the images are being acquired they will be useless and will have to be repeated.

Does it Hurt? – NO! - MRI is a painless examination. You will not feel any pain or abnormal sensations during the scan. Some examinations require the injection of a contrast medium. This is a substance which improves the visualisation of certain structures within the body. The injection is given through small needle inserted in a vein (usually) in your arm. There are no side effects from this injection.

AFTER THE SCAN
Once all your images are acquired and checked you are free to leave the department.
The results of the test will be sent to the doctor who asked for you to have an MRI scan. This will take up to 5 - 7 working days. You should make an appointment to see the doctor again and have the results explained to you.

Dexa Scan

Information Sheet For DEXA SCAN

Patient Name____________________________
Your appointment for the above procedure is

_________________________. Please contact the Radiology Dept. on the above number if you cannot avail of this appointment.


Your doctor has requested that you have a DEXA Scan. This is an X-ray examination, which provides information about the Bone Mineral Density (strength) of your bones.

Attention Female Patients
This examination cannot be performed if you are pregnant or there is any possibility of pregnancy. If you are aged between approximately 11 – 55 years, your appointment must be within 10 days of the start of your last menstrual period.

DO I NEED TO FOLLOW A SPECIAL DIET?
NO. You may eat and drink as normal prior to the scan

IS THERE ANY PREPARATION ?
If possible please wear loose clothing e.g. tracksuit, elasticated skirt/trousers – no roll-on, corset, underwired bra

Please ensure that if you are taking calcium supplements that you do not take them on the day of your DEXA scan.
A DEXA scan cannot be performed until 1 month after a barium study or a CT scan with oral contrast.

WHAT HAPPENS ON THE DAY OF THE EXAMINATION?
You will enter the hospital through the new main entrance on Craddockstown Road. The Radiology Department is signposted from there and is a short distance away. On arrival at radiology reception you will attend to any of the reception hatches where you will be registered for the examination. You will be brought to the DEXA room and you will change into a hospital gown if necessary. You will be weighed and your height measured prior to the scan

WHAT DOES THE PROCEDURE INVOLVE?
You will lie on your back on the DEXA scanner table and will be moved into the scanning position. The Radiographer will position you accurately for the different images required. Part of the scanner will move over the body as the images are taken. It will not make contact with you and the whole examination is entirely painless. It is important that you remain still during the examination. A total of three images are usually taken – lower back (front and side) and left hip. The entire examination takes approximately 20 minutes to complete.

Radiology
    
    
        
        | Naas General Hospital (2024)

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